As a “Wine Estate”, Springfontein relies exclusively on grapes from its own vineyards, located directly on the farm, with their unique limestone soils and their special microclimate, special flora and fauna. On a certified organic farm like ours, naturally vine growing is carried out without the use of any chemical fertilizers and under an extremely restrictive spraying regime to limit the use of pesticides as far as even possible.

Finally, within our quasi-“monopole” Springfontein Rim, we have a number of individual sites or “clos” that stand even out from the total area under cultivation, such as Jonathan’s Ridge and Jil’s Dune, whose grapes we vinify separately at great expense in order to express the unique soil and weather conditions under which the wines are grown in these designated parcels.

Our Cultivars

In doing this, we are increasingly concentrating on the cultivation of Pinotage and Chenel, two indigenous grape varieties developed in South Africa. Pinotage was created in 1925 by Abraham Perold, owner of the first viticulture professorship established at the University of Stellenbosch, as a cross between Pinot Noir and Cinsault, in our country commonly known as “Hermitage”. Chenel was born almost 50 years later as a hybrid of the parents’ couple Chenin Blanc and Trebbiano Toscano by Christiaan Orffer, who also held the professorship at the chair of Viticulture and Oenology in Stellenbosch from 1963 to 1986 and was one of the founding fathers of the South African Society for Oenology & Viticulture. In addition to Pinotage and Chenel, Springfontein is also planted with some of the well-known European varieties which we take mainly as blending partners for our core varietals.

Depending on the specific location, we use either single stake culture, bush culture or classic trellis culture.

Our Cultivars

In doing this, we are increasingly concentrating on the cultivation of Pinotage and Chenel, two indigenous grape varieties developed in South Africa. Pinotage was created in 1925 by Abraham Perold, owner of the first viticulture professorship established at the University of Stellenbosch, as a cross between Pinot Noir and Cinsault, in our country commonly known as “Hermitage”. Chenel was born almost 50 years later as a hybrid of the parents’ couple Chenin Blanc and Trebbiano Toscano by Christiaan Orffer, who also held the professorship at the chair of Viticulture and Oenology in Stellenbosch from 1963 to 1986 and was one of the founding fathers of the South African Society for Oenology & Viticulture. In addition to Pinotage and Chenel, Springfontein is also planted with some of the well-known European varieties which we take mainly as blending partners for our core varietals.

Depending on the specific location, we use either single stake culture, bush culture or classic trellis culture.

Own Nursery & Abalone Composting

As planting material we use rootstocks and scions from certified nurseries, and more and more young vines from our own greenhouse cultivation. This enables us to also plant ungrafted, hence “true” vines. The concern that phylloxera might put a spoke in our vinegrowing wheel seems minimal due to the quality of our soil, especially since no viticulture has been practised in the valley before we started in 1996. On the other hand, we expect that by doing without the usual American root media, the authentic taste characteristics particularly of the black Pinotage and the white Chenel berries will come into its own significantly better.

The authenticity of grape varieties and their reflection of the terroir is to be supported by the introduction of specially prepared compost. Here, we do not only use organic material from Springfontein and neighbouring farms. We also have a patent for the production of a special additive for the cultivation of plants and especially wine, which is based on the essence of „abalones“, known as perlemoen in the Afrikaans-speaking world. This species of sea snail, often misunderstood as a bivalve mollusc, which has one of its worldwide rare breeding grounds in the Walker Bay, has extremely high levels of proteins and minerals, especially selenium, magnesium and vitamin B12. In Asia, abalones are therefore also highly regarded as an aphrodisiac. We think that the valuable residues we use from the abalone-processing in Hermanus and Gansbaai are a valuable help for us in our ecological organic bio-viticulture – and will certainly find their way into our wine.

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